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Developing nations can save $40 bn per year by switching to LED lighting: UN

Developing nations can save $40 bn per year by switching to LED lighting: UN

By BizLED Bureau

Nov 21, 2017: Simply by shifting to efficient LED lighting, developing and emerging economies can save electricity worth of $40 billion, and prevent 320 million metric tonnes of carbon pollution annually, according to estimates by the United Nation’s Environment.

The United Nation’s Environment announced new model regulations that will help to phase out inefficient incandescent light bulbs, and establish minimum performance requirements for the LED bulbs to replace them in Asia, Africa, and Latin America.

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Worldwide, lighting accounts for 15% of all electricity, and many countries are still using incandescent light bulbs, which consume huge electricity. The United Nation’s Environment pointed out that by switching over to super-efficient LED lighting, developing and emerging economies can save huge amount of electricity. While in Europe and the US incandescent light bulbs are due to be phased out in mid-2018 and 2020, respectively, these inefficient light bulbs will still be used in developing countries.

LED bulbs are today technologically advanced, and can save 85% energy to produce the same amount of light as the old incandescent did. Instead of using 60-watt incandescent bulb, a 10-watt LED bulb can be used.

Model regulations

The United for Efficiency will soon publish the model regulation, a public-private partnership led by UN Environment. The regulation contains description of products, definitions, test methods, minimum efficiency levels, and a set of common-sense minimum quality/performance requirements along with market surveillance that will help ensure consumers have a good experience with LED bulbs. The model regulation will be provided to United for Efficiency partner countries in Asia, Africa, and Latin America.

The model regulation is also supported by leading environmental groups such as the Natural Resources Defense Council (NRDC), UN Environment, and various national governments, and leading lighting manufacturers.

By adopting these regulations, developing and emerging countries will not become the dumping grounds for incandescents and halogens, or poor-quality LED bulbs.

 

 

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